(Stock image for illustration purposes) Lorry driver Renganathan Krishnasamy, 62, said he was told to leave when he questioned his employer about his Employees Provident Fund (EPF) and Social Security Organisation (Socso) contributions.

A SENIOR citizen is in a bind when he was dismissed from his job for questioning his employer.

Lorry driver Renganathan Krishnasamy, 62, said he was told to leave when he questioned his employer about his Employees Provident Fund (EPF) and Social Security Organisation (Socso) contributions.

He was employed by the transportation company early this year and promised a Monday-to- Friday job, with a daily salary of RM70 for two trips of delivery.

However, he noted that his EPF and Socso contributions were not deducted from his monthly salary.

“Since January, I have been reminding my boss about it. Without Socso contributions, I will not be able to claim in the event of an untoward incident, such as an accident.”

He said it was risky as an accident could jeorpardise his future and he might not be able to work again.

“Each time I asked my boss, he told me that the management was working on it, but nothing was done.

“Early this month, when I reminded my boss again, I raised my voice a bit. I was dismissed and told to leave immediately.”

Renganathan, who is taking care of his 83-year-old mother, said it was unfair for his boss to terminate him without any discussion.

He claimed that he was not paid for the seven days of work prior to his sacking.

ACTIONLINE: Renganathan’s former employer said all staff had been informed prior to employment that there would be no EPF and Socso deductions since the company was small and had fewer than 10 workers.

“However, if they insist on the deductions, they may apply
on their own,” said the employer, who declined to be identified.

“This is not something new to my employees. Most of my employees are on a contractual basis. We pay them daily.

“We do not have the resources for EPF and Sosco deductions since the company is small.”

He said he had been calling Renganathan regarding his salary for the last seven days, but failed.

“I will pay the salary as it is rightfully his, but he has yet to contact me.”

Malaysian Employers Federation executive director Datuk Shamsuddin Bardan said the deduction of EPF for employees depended on the nature of the contract of service.

“If it is a normal contract of service, the deductions are done by the company.

“If it is on a contractual basis, the employee can register and contribute to EPF on his own. In this case, he can register to contribute as a self-employed,” he told Actionline.

He said if Renganathan was unhappy with the dismissal, he could lodge a complaint with the Industrial Relations Department. If he had yet to receive his salary, he could complain to the Labour Department, he added.

A spokesman for Socso said Renganathan could go to the nearest office and lodge a complaint so that the department could investigate the case.

He said the contributions for Socso depended on the nature of the contract of service.

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