Former DAP vice-chairman Tunku Abdul Aziz Tunku Ibrahim said Lim Kit Siang’s iron fist rule of DAP had led to the recent mass exodus of its members. Pix by Zulfadhli Zulkifli

KUALA LUMPUR: Former DAP vice-chairman Tunku Abdul Aziz Tunku Ibrahim said Lim Kit Siang’s iron fist rule of DAP had led to the recent mass exodus of its members.

He noted that the resignations in such large numbers are symptoms of deep-seated structural and leadership issues, which have now been thrown into sharp focus because of a general loss of confidence in the leadership.

It also revealed serious doubt on the relevance of the policies adopted by Kit Siang’s leadership in today’s political context, he said.

“In fact, I think the exodus is so serious that I think the party will falter in the next general election.

“The disgruntlement is nothing new, but they had tolerated it in the past for the sake of party unity.

“But now, they had enough of the democracy championed by Kit Siang, which is a misnomer,” he said during a press conference here today.

Recently, 182 DAP members jointly exited the party in Malacca following the resignation of its MP and three assemblymen in the state in February, all citing “loss of confidence” in the party.

He warned that Kit Siang’s “longest one man show in politics” will led to more DAP leaders and members in other states leaving the party.

Tunku Aziz said based on his personal experience on the inner workings of DAP’s top management, the top leaders will do anything to keep dissent at bay.

He added that DAP is a party which is totally negative and regressive, and it won’t be surprising if more DAP members quit the party as they want the freedom to express what they think.

Tunku Aziz also lambasted DAP as being a political party that always inflame the Chinese to go against the government for the sake of opposing.

“With DAP around, there will be little opportunity for the Chinese to help in the development of the nation,” said the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission advisory board chairman.

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