The incident on March 14 near Butterworth was uncalled for and proved that the teen driver was reckless and driving under the influence of drugs.

I REFER to the report “Gen 2 driver was hallucinating” (NST, March 16). Drugs and fast cars may be elements of a Hollywood movie, but it is a disaster if our drivers are involved with them.

The incident on March 14 near Butterworth was uncalled for and proved that the teen driver was reckless and driving under the influence of drugs. It was reported that a urine test showed that the 19-year-old part-time model was high on methamphetamine.

I hope the incident will serve as a lesson to all of us on the need to ensure that our roads are free from reckless drivers, especially those who are under the influence of alcohol and drugs.

Enforcement agencies must conduct frequent checks to stop such drivers from endangering the lives of other road users.

Previously, many roadblocks were held in the wee hours to nab reckless drivers who were high on drugs or drunk.

Although some are against the use of breathalysers, they should realise that under the law, enforcement agencies are allowed to use the device to check a driver’s alcohol level.

Driving under the influence is a serious offence under the Road Transport Act 1987, and if it causes death or injury, a driver can be charged under Section 44 (1), which carries a jail term of between three and 10 years, and a fine of between RM8,000 and RM20,000.

The public should also alert the authorities if they see anyone driving recklessly. But the public should not take the law into their own hands when an accident occurs. There have been reports of drivers involved in crashes being attacked.

We should focus on ensuring that those who drive recklessly are punished under the law.

TAN SRI LEE LAM THYE

Chairman, Malaysian Institute of Road Safety Research

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