We must help teachers in their quest to educate our children.

EVERY May 16, the country will celebrate Teachers Day.

Why May 16? It was the date in 1956 when the Federal Legislative Council accepted the recommendations by the Education Committee Report as the education policy for our country. The document, widely known as the Razak Report, has since become the National Education Policy.

Teachers Day is celebrated to draw attention to and emphasise the important role that teachers play in nation-building.

Teachers face many challenges to fulfil their duties to educate the student and ensure he or she grows up properly and becomes a useful member of society.

With new communication technologies and a borderless world, everyone, especially children, is being exposed to ideas, threats and examples.

We are exposed to issues concerning students’ delinquent behaviour, such as drug abuse, gangsterism and bullying. As much as teachers have tried their best to deal with the problems, they persist.

There will be some who point the finger at teachers for the problems faced by students.

In this age of social media, feelings of dissatisfaction can easily be expressed online and become viral.

This can harm not only the targeted teacher, but also jeopardise and destroy the reputation of our education system.

If we focus on finding fault and list ways to punish a teacher for his or her mistakes, it will not lead us to solutions that will solve the problems faced by students.

It is impossible for teachers to educate pupils without having full support from the society, especially from parents.

We must help our teachers in their quest to educate our younger generation.

Society and parents should share the burden with teachers. Pointing fingers and finding fault will not do anyone any good.

Happy Teachers Day.

DR MUZAFFAR SYAH MALLOW,

Senior Lecturer, Faculty Syariah & Law, Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia (USIM)

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